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Monday, June 25, 2012

Coat Hanger Weaving



I had a Facebook follower ask for some details on this project, so here they are! I didn't have a complete set of photos (I usually don't blog until I know I have enough photos to cover the steps), so I had to draw out some of the steps. I hope my diagrams are clear enough. If not, please don't hesitate to ask questions! 


MATERIALS: wire coat hangers, yarn, ribbon, and 
scraps of long, thin anything that you can use for weaving!

Preparing the Loom:

 Click on the photos to enlarge them.












At this point, you should have something that looks like this:


To begin weaving, cut a piece of yarn (as long as you wish) and tie it to the center of the loom, where all of the yarn came together. Start weaving under and over the yarn "spokes" in a circular pattern.








When the yarn runs out, tie another one on to the end and continue weaving. Continue in this fashion until you get closer to the edge. You can make this as large as you'd like. To finish it off, tie the tail of the yarn to one of the spokes. Hang and enjoy!






Some finished weavings. Different types of yarn creates interest, especially eyelash yarn.

















Update: This is what they look like if removed from the coat hanger. They do shrink a bit. I have been having the kids take them off the hanger and we hot glue them to a piece of matboard.






Directions to remove:
1. Cut one of the pieces of yarn that is tied to the hanger. Make sure to cut it close to the edge so that you have a long enough piece to tie a knot. Tie this piece to the end of the yarn you just finished weaving with.
2. Continue around the hanger, cutting two at a time and tying them together in a knot. Don't tie them too tightly or you will end up with a bowl because the sides will roll!

12 comments:

  1. This is such a cool weaving project! I love that it also uses such simple materials: yarn and a coat hanger. One question, though: doesn't the yarn (warp threads/spokes) 'slide' or move around the coat hanger while your working? Thanks so much for sharing the instructions!

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  2. Believe it or not, if you pull the yarn tight enough, it doesn't really move once you get going. Hope you have fun trying this!

    Denise

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  3. Have you ever taken the weaving off the hanger? It seems like it would be a good size for a trivet.

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  4. Yes, we have. They do shrink considerably, though! They would probably work for a trivet. I will add a photo showing the result of taking it off the hanger.

    Denise

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  5. Love these! What grade level did you do these with? I do spiral weavings with 3rd grade but using a square piece of tagboard with slits cut into it- I'd be interested in trying this idea.

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  6. Thanks! I did these with 5th grade because I wasn't sure how hard it would be for young hands, but I now think that even 2nd or 3rd graders could handle it with minimal help on setting up the loom.

    Denise

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  7. This is great! I'm pinning it!
    -Angie

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  8. I love this idea, am definitely going to use it with my class!

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  9. Hi,I love this and am doing this right now actually. Just a quick question though - how do you take it off the loom? Thanks!

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  10. Funny- I am just finishing these with my students. :-)
    Last year, we left them on the hanger, but this year we are taking them off.
    We are untying the knots from the hanger and then tying the "tails" together in pairs. Since there will be an odd number of tails, they tied the last tail to the end of the last piece of yarn they wove. I hope that makes sense!
    We will be mounting them to matboard. I will post photos when we are finished.
    Denise

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  11. Great idea! I am thinking that if you did this with cotton yarn or fabric strips they would make neat coasters or hot pads that could be washed.

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  12. Love this! Doing it with my 6th graders now. How do we tie off the loom??

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