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Sunday, August 31, 2014

Art Room Redoux




20 years. I needed a change; something totally new. After years of using every color of the rainbow (check out last year's version), I decided to tone down my art room. I also teach at an Arts Academy, so I get plenty of color there. I wanted my every day space to be... calm. Well, as calm as possible with over 550 students traipsing in and out!

I chose the colors teal, lime, black, and white and went with it. It is amazing how much you can do with spray paint, scrapbook paper, Goodwill finds, and a trip to IKEA!

I hope you enjoy the tour of my "new" art room. I know it isn't your typical studio space!

 I always try to decorate the hallway leading to my room with something eye-catching for open house.


The kids each made a self portrait for the empty spaces.



I found some cute owl cut outs from Wal-Mart (seen later on my tables) and decided to use him as our art "mascot". I made my own, larger version to hang in the hall.





This is the view in to my room. Wish I could change those floor tiles...



 I will give you a quick overview of the room as viewed from the front, beginning to the left. I will then go in to detail about each area. 











This rug is from IKEA and costs $20!



Now that we are back to the door, I will take you around for a closer view.
This is the view as you walk in to the room.


And then, as you look to the right.


Here is a close up of  my bulletin board that I have finished. I have my project charts at the top and 
spots for Post-It Note exit tickets. The letters above are from Hobby Lobby, spray painted to match.



The kids know I like birds and owls and often bring them to me. Why fight it? I used many owls and birds throughout the room, including this birdcage I snagged at Hobby Lobby for $2.50! The "Sign Out" frame is for the kids to write on with dry erase marker when leaving the room so I have a visual reference.


The front of my desk is covered in wrapping paper from Wal-Mart. Are you getting the idea that I am CHEAP???  The painting on the front of my desk was made by my husband during one of my painting classes at the Academy where I teach every Friday and Saturday evening. He knows that if he wants to see me, he has to take a class!






The three pocket owl chart was found on clearance at Meijer. It holds our self-assessment and peer-assessment forms.

I love my desk area. Everything is so organized... for now! Remember how it usually looks?



The wax burner is from Scentsy and uses a light bulb. It was a splurge and makes the whole room smell wonderful! The little owl was found at Goodwill and got a spray paint makeover.


Here are our classroom rules. I spray painted the letters and velcro'd them to the wall so I can remove a letter if a class is too loud. If they lose all their letters, there is no more art and they must clean up and sit quietly. I have only had to resort to this a few times in 20 years.



This bucket system is also from IKEA and it holds my white board supplies.


After it was installed, I realized that I can't open my the top drawer of the file cabinet. OOPS! Guess I will have to re-arrange at some point!



Wrapping paper found at Dollar General covers the ugly file cabinet.

My lovely family. Love!

Can I tell you how happy this makes me? HAHA! I shouldn't be so crazy about these things, but I just can't help myself. Seeing all of those binders all lined up and matchy-matchy makes me smile.


This is what the covers of my binders look like. Scrapbook paper slid in to the clear pocket of the binder makes all the difference.
And how is everyone coming along on those SLOs? (or whatever they may be called in your neck of the woods)

This drawer cart stores the art projects I hold for our annual art show. The ceramic bird house was made by an Ohio artist. When I go to our yearly state conference, he is usually there at the Artist Market and I buy myself a birthday gift from him.



Ok, I do realize that these are ware carts, but they work SO nicely for storage! The kids' artwork is stored here in class files.


The bins are from Big Lots and Dollar General. A steal. The larger baskets will hold all the supplies for the current projects we are working on, separated by grade level.



This little corner of the room hold our art library. The daisy painting was made by me during another of my weekend painting classes.


This is new for me this year. I was at an SLO training this summer and it was suggested that we post a visual rubric. This is what I decided upon, referencing our standards based grade card that we currently use for grades Pre-K-2.


A closer look at the visual rubric. The zebra print letters are from Wal-Mart and cost 97 cents a pack!



See those hug letters above my cabinets. Made those. Yep, I made those. I saw some at Jo-Ann Fabrics for $10 each and thought, "I can do that!" (Come on, we've all done that!) I drew two duplicate letters on black poster board.


I then hot glued paper cups between the boards to help it keep its shape.





I measured the depth of the letters and cut out a bunch of strips, adding 1/2" to each side. I cut several tabs out of each side so they looked like this:


I don't have a photo of the process, but I bent the tabs and hot glued them to the top and bottom of the letters. It was a messy project, but I plan on possibly decoupaging the heck out of them later.
*Note to self- take a closer photo of the letters to show how they are put together.


The tops of my cabinets used to be packed full of stuff that was awesome, but gathered tons of dust.
Now, they are clean.




This is another new area of the art room. I spray painted a bunch of interesting frames from Goodwill and hung them by ribbon (and tons of hot glue!) I plan on showcasing student art throughout the year here.


Here, one of my paintings sits with an owl sewn by one of my FIRST GRADERS. I kid you not. She has a Facebook page, but it lists her address and I am not comfortable posting it here. You will just have to trust me. She is now in second grade and has her own business creating stuffed animals. Amazing! We named this owl "Matisse".



I did end up investing in new plastic storage bins from IKEA


I made a HUGE deal about how awesome and organized everything is, telling my students that I had to drive all the way to Michigan to buy these boxes. I really hope the kids will help keep it looking nice. I have hope!



Here I have photos of some of my students that visited me at my art Academy for a birthday pARTy.


Are you required to post I CAN statements or student objectives? Last year, I made a watercolor paint display and loved it, but it wasn't practical- it fell down all the time. Bummer. This year, I kept it simple and hung them on a bulletin board. Hey, it works.





Here is a closer look at my tables. I wrapped them in white paper, a plastic tablecloth, and then thick vinyl from Jo-Ann. Expensive, but effective. At the end of the year, I rip off the layers and my table look brand new. Last year, I used thinner vinyl, but it ripped easily. This year, I bought the heavy stuff.

I added a small trash can from the Dollar Tree and frame from IKEA that holds a different artist for each table. I will change these periodically so they will learn new artists throughout the year.

Here is a closer look at Ollie, our mascot. He lets the kids know what their number is and this is how I assign jobs.



Feedback??? I know I have gone waaaayyy outside the box this year, but I am loving it. My principal has brought several other teachers to my room to show them how "Disgusting" it is. LOL. She loves it- she means that it is disgustingly put together and color coordinated.

*By the way- I just realized that I didn't mark all of these photos as mine, so if you share them, please link back. It has been so long since I have blogged, it slipped my mind!

Thanks for viewing!
Denise aka mrspicasso

Saturday, November 2, 2013

Warm & Cool Swirling Leaves


 
I've been wanting to post about these for awhile, but Blogger kept rotating my photos. Finally, I figured out how to copy & paste them in from Picassa. Yay!
 

Warm & Cool Swirling Leaves

I made these beauties with first graders.
 

Materials:

Here is what we used:
white drawing  paper (9" X 12"), tissue paper (cut in to small squares), Mod-Podge or other decoupage glue, foam brushes, scissors, pencil, black markers- thick, chalk pastels, variety of 9" X 12" construction paper in cool colors, black construction paper (12" X 15"), glue
 


Encounter:



Here is what we did:
 
We first studied warm & cool colors and played a sorting game (pictured below). I laminated several rectangles of construction paper & added a magnet to the back. Students take turns coming up and placing their colors in the correct area.





We then decoupaged tissue paper to the white drawing paper. I gave each table a tray of tissue paper squares. I did NOT separate the warm & cool colors- this was their job.

 
 
To decoupage the tissue papers on, use a foam brush to apply the Mod-Podge glue to the paper, add the tissue paper on top, and then cover the tissue with more glue.
 
 
 Continue adding glue until the paper is completely covered.
 


We used gloss Mod-Podge, which leaves a nice shiny coat.

 

Drawing the leaf. I had the students turn their papers over (when dry) and draw using pencil. (I have shown the steps in black so that they show up better). I will use the language that I used with the kids; sometimes it is silly, but it works.
 
1. Put your paper in front of you so that it is vertical. Draw a vertical line that almost touches the top & bottom.



2. Draw a "hat" over the line. Be sure to make it big.



3. Draw two diagonal lines that make a letter V and look like arms. 
 


 4. Draw a hat on each of the arms. Make them big!
 
 
5. Connect the hats with a smiling line.
 
 

 6. Draw another set of diagonal lines to make a letter V that look like arms.




7. Add hats to each of these arms. Remember to make them big!



8. Connect the hats with smiling lines.


9. Bring the bottoms of the hats toward the middle. They should almost touch the vertical line.


 
10. Draw the stem by making a line that goes around the vertical line. It almost looks like a french fry!


At this point, I actually walked around and outlined their leaves with thick black marker. I normally do not draw on student work and NEVER on the actual front of the art, but they really needed the dark line to follow while cutting. I did not trace the vertical lines or the V lines. Again, I want to stress that I only traced over their lines.

Cut out the leaves, following the black lines.


We then added the veins to the leaves. We looked at real leaves before drawing our veins.
First, we drew the midrib, as shown.



 Then, we drew the side veins, one for each lobe.
 


 Next, I had the students choose a cool colored piece of paper and glued them to the black paper background.




The srudents used cool colored chalk pastels to draw on their paper. Again, I didn't separate the colors, but made them make the color decisions.


They drew swirling lines to represent the wind. Some lines were to go right on to the black paper background.

 
I asked them to trace the chalk lines with their fingertip. I demonstrated this and showed them how the chalk smears if you rub it back and forth. Instead, they were to only follow the lines. 
 
 
Here are two examples of the swirling wind lines, one with many lines and one with only a few.


Here are some "action shots" of the kids working.



Finally, we glued our leaves to the backgrounds. We discussed how leaves fall in all directions and I encouraged them to think about placement. I asked them what would happen if they rubbed the leaf on the top and they caught on that the chalk would smear. Instead, I had them turn their papers over and "give them a back rub"and write their name & class code on the back.
Disclaimer: these are not my hands, but those of a lovely fifth grade student. My hands aren't nearly as pretty!


 Here are some of the finished works of art. Beautiful!